Review: “Clean Enough” by Katzie Guy-Hamilton

Let’s go back to what I love doing best: dissecting cookbooks. I chose this particular one because I found both the title and the cover photo appealing, and because ‘katzie’ in German is a pet name for a cat (sympathy points!). The beautiful photography continues inside the book and really gets you revved up for cooking… unless you’re a beginner. One recurring problem with cookbooks authored by professional chefs is that they love to be very specific with ingredients and, unlike most normal people, think nothing of a twenty-five-ingredient spice list. Ok, I slightly exaggerated that number, but you get my drift.

But let us start at the beginning: Ms. Guy-Hamilton’s introduction to “Clean Enough”, alongside her story, pretty much makes it clear that this book is yours to customize, which is a very important point to bear in mind later. I like her holistic approach to food and life, and her relaxed attitude about occasional indulgences. After all, eating clean enough should be good enough, and sweets can play a stress-free part in one’s diet, as well. Please note that when I say ‘diet,’ I use the word in its original meaning of ‘way of eating,’ not in the sense of ‘trying your darndest to make your body comply to shed those x number of pounds you keep trying to lose whenever you come back from vacation.’

The reader receives an invitation to examine his or her own lifestyle to maximize wellness with some helpful pointers, then it’s on to the recipe section…

…and we’ve circled back to the beginning where now some people will start crying at terms like “oat flaker,” “Sicilian pistachios,” “pine pollen,” and “raw licorice powder” (I did at that last one, primarily because I find licorice disgusting and would never want to ruin a perfectly good breakfast with it). Ignore all those terms and skip straight to the various recipe notes that tell you that you can SUBSTITUTE whatever you have on hand or simply leave things out that you don’t have/don’t want to use. Phew. Ok, deep breath and on with it…

I’m not sure if anyone really needs a recipe for hot lemon water, which contains, gasp!, hot water and lemon. Or instructions to cook a runny, five-minute egg (cook egg for five minutes, plus some extraneous stuff that’s not really necessary). But if you’ve never made eggs before and feel a bit lost, there is a section on preparing eggs in a variety of ways that will assist you in becoming more kitchen confident. You may have guessed from my lingering on this particular part of the book that this is a vegetarian cookbook. Ms. Guy-Hamilton enjoys eggs and cheeses, and that is one reason why I personally would not get a copy but still recommend it to anyone wishing to go meat-free more often or looking for new spins on cooking for their veggie lifestyle.

I notice that, as most other hip chefs these days, Ms. Guy-Hamilton is a huge proponent of Himalayan Pink salt, to which I will repeat my remark from an earlier review: salt mining is not environmentally friendly, nor is salt a sustainable resource, and nobody should go digging around in sensitive areas like the Himalayas just so people can use pink salt that nobody will be able to see in the finished dish later, anyway. As a second concern, unless you eat a lot of seafood or sea vegetables, reliance on “raw” salts will leave you with low levels of iodine. This is why regular table salt has iodine added to it, and as much as it is en vogue to poo-poo anything labeled ‘processed’, you need iodine in your diet. Eat it, hipster!

In the second recipe section, Enough, you are immediately reminded that the author is a trained pastry chef. If your mind wasn’t boggled before, it will be now as you peruse the rather extensive list of recommended equipment. A bit less scary and possibly more useful are the explanations of various preparation techniques. The treats themselves are as simple or extravagant as you choose, from cookie varieties to tortes, tarts, cakes, pies, and an assortment of small baked goods like muffins, scones, brioche, and even hot cross buns. Merengue lovers will find a fine selection here, but the good old chocolate pudding makes an appearance, as well, as do custards, sorbets, and ice creams. A selection of sweet pantry staples rounds out the book.

Please note that it is absolutely essential to read every recipe through before you spontaneously discover that it will take fourteen days to prepare certain parts in advance and that your pantry is lacking a key ingredient, because I make fun of people like you who leave angry ranting reviews like that. I repeat, some recipes do require you to make parts of it in advance, then assemble the whole later, like the Israeli breakfast.

In short, if you can get over your fear of long lists and feel comfortable enough to make substitutions to accommodate your cooking style, this is a lovely book to add to your shelf.

“Clean Enough” is published by The Experiment, whom I love for their variety of titles. I received a free copy from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own.

clean enough

One thought on “Review: “Clean Enough” by Katzie Guy-Hamilton

  1. Pingback: Review: “The Ultimate Vegan Breakfast Book” by Nadine Horn and Jörg Mayer | Stop and Smell the Pages

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