Author Interview: Peter Stafford-Bow of “Corkscrew” and “Brut Force”

During this hectic time of year, it is as difficult as necessary to occasionally take a timeout and allot a few minutes to enjoy the lovely things in life: a mug of hot chocolate, a foot rub, a good book, or at the very least, a good interview. I am tickled to present to you today a mini interview I was able to snag with Peter Stafford-Bow, whose novels I had the pleasure to review this year. Click the book title to find out more about “Corkscrew” and “Brut Force.” Then grab that chocolate, put up your feet, and get ready for the inside scoop about Felix Hart’s upcoming exploits, the secret to remaining incognito, and what should be on your wine list this season.

Stop and Smell the Pages: There has been relatively little time between your first book, “Corkscrew,” and the latest, “Brut Force.” How many adventures did you plan for, and how has the initial concept for the novel(s) changed?

Peter Stafford-Bow: Actually, Corkscrew was written 3-4 years ago and self-published. I landed an agent and publishing deal after I’d sold a few thousand copies – I’d been working on Brut Force since well before Corkscrew was ‘discovered’ by the traditional publishing industry! I definitely have another couple of Felix Hart novels in me. After that, it really depends whether my readers want more! Or, whether Netflix insist on a five-series deal, of course.

SSTP: The ending of “Brut Force” gives a pretty big hint that Paris-Blois may not be done with Felix quite yet. What could possibly follow a rigged wine tasting, assassination attempts, and multi-layered conspiracies? Will Lily return, and could she be the woman to permanently partner up with him?

PSB: I’m not sure whether either Felix or Lily are the type for settling down! The third novel sees Felix sent on a sabbatical, after accidentally killing his Gatesave CEO, to work for an African charity. Paris-Blois make an appearance, as do the Minstrels of Wine. That’s quite enough spoilers though, you’ll have to wait until summer 2019…

SSTP:  In an interview after “Corkscrew”, you made a joke about turning the novel into a movie, if only Hollywood would get in touch already. Personally, I’d love to see an on-screen adaptation. Has anyone picked up on the idea? And even if not, who would your casting choices be for any of the characters?

PSB: I haven’t sold the rights yet, though I understand my agent has had a couple of enquiries. I think Felix should be played by Bradley James. I think he’d bring great depth to the role of a drunken, caddish layabout.

SSTP: After two successful novels, how much longer can you remain the Banksy of viticulture? Has anyone managed to discover your secret identity just by reading the books?

PSB: A few people have tried to guess, but to no avail. Most people get my gender wrong, for a start! I have employed a few tricks to obscure my identity. I have a body-double to attend book signings, for example, and when I dine with my agent, I suspend a silk screen across the table, so he only sees my silhouette.

SSTP: In a similar vein, are you doing author readings for “Brut Force”? How are book sales overseas? Do we stand a chance of seeing you here in the US?

PSB: Over half of my sales are in the US! The market is much bigger, of course, and I’m honoured to have quite a big readership in the wine regions of the West Coast. I would love to do a Stateside publicity tour – and I’m well overdue a research trip to Napa, Sonoma and the Willamette Valley.

SSTP:  And finally: with the holidays approaching, what are your wine tips to make a grape enthusiast happy?

PSB: My top tip is to seek out relatively unfashionable wine regions! Germany and Austria make superb wine, of course, and there are some gems in Slovenia too. I’m a big Sherry fan and, as a patriot, I have to recommend English Sparkling Wine. There are some magnificent fizzes being made by some of the very small, boutique producers, such as Oxney, Wiston Estate and Hoffmann & Rathbone. Cheers and Happy Holidays!

Review: “Brut Force” by Peter Stafford-Bow

Sometimes, this humble little blog truly surprises me. Through my contact page, I have received offers for ARCs, which I appreciate very much, even if my list is currently quite full and pirate capers aren’t so much my genre (sorry, but thank you!). Occasionally, I get comments from people who are too shy to comment. And sometimes, I get emails from an author I’ve reviewed. Let me tell you: all that communication really makes my day! I hope you have realized by now that even if I don’t much care for a particular book, I try to be fair about the reasons why I feel that way. Rare is the book I really, truly hate, and those I would not waste anyone’s time reviewing (yes, I have axed titles from my Netgalley list even, because they were badly researched, poorly written, or worst of all, both). You should also know by now that I mean it when I say that opinions on books are my own. If you offer me a review copy and I have reason to niggle, I will.

One new title that has given me absolutely no reason at all for complaint is Peter Stafford-Bow’s latest novel, “Brut Force,” the sequel to Felix Hart’s adventures first set forth in “Corkscrew” (my review here, just don’t ask what was going on with that introductory paragraph). Young Felix Hart is now a few years older, but still living with an assortment of colorful characters in his Little Chalfont flat, still going strong at Gatesave as Head of Wine, and unfortunately for him, still entangled with wine & spirits leviathan, Paris-Blois.  When two local wine aficionados decide to pit Old World and New World Pinot Noirs against each other in a double blind tasting, the reputation of Paris-Blois’ own market-dominating wine is at stake. Never a company to deal fairly when trickery can be employed, Felix’s old acquaintances, Pierre and Sandra resort to blackmail to get Felix into the contest as a judge whose job it is to ensure that Paris-Blois comes out on top. Naturally, nothing goes according to plan, whatever the plan of the moment may be, and Felix ends up being quite entangled in not one, but several conspiracies, working hard to escape unscathed while desperately trying to sort out who’s friend or foe.

I liked the first book. It was different and amusing, even though Felix, being a typical young man in many respects, occasionally made me want to slap him upside the head. Older Felix still loves his life, his job, and the ladies, but I find him far less irritating and far more entertaining. From page 1, I couldn’t help but break out into chuckles, which some of the people passing the breakroom at work may have found odd. Mr Stafford-Bow has found a wonderful balance of humor, pacing, and plot twists to make “Brut Force” even more engaging than “Corkscrew.” The very end of the book plants a suggestion that the novelist may not be done with Felix Hart just yet, and that is a promise I’m very much looking forward to seeing fulfilled! Another point I find refreshing is the loving care given to wine descriptions, as one would expect from an author who is intimately familiar with the industry. It’s fairly commonplace these days to find a writer indulging in lengthy descriptions of fine meals (see Donna Leon or Andrea Camilleri), so why not wine? Finally, this is really more of a technical issue, but one I found quite wonderful on a personal level: the editing is superb. Normally, I find misspellings, lost words, or grammar errors, even when I’m not looking for them (believe me, I don’t look, really!); “Brut Force” was fabulously free of any of those.

Do I have a niggle? Yes, a very tiny one. I would have preferred it had they left the subtitle “The further, staggering adventures of a professional wine buyer” off the cover. Sure, it’s punny, but it seems entirely unnecessary. Would that keep me from wholeheartedly recommending this book to you? Not at all! If you love wine, mad capers, or simply a fun read, get yourself a copy. It will lift your mood and erase frown lines from your face. I’ll drink to that!

“Brut Force” is published by Acorn Publishing. I received a free copy from the author in exchange for a review. All opinions are, as always, my own.

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